Posts Tagged ‘post production’

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ADR Productions

User generated sites mostly offer free services whereby users can upload video clips and share it with the masses. Many sites place restrictions on the file size, duration, subject matter and format of the uploaded video file. Many sites do not allow inappropriate content though each site makes judgment calls on what qualifies as inappropriate content, usually via its Terms of Service information. Some sites provide access control to adult material where the user must verify that they are of adult age. Some sites screen all their content before it is published and others approve first and use community features to filter out inappropriate content “after-the-fact.”

Click on the site names below to learn more about them.

Notable examples

Types of Videos Used for Your Business & Profitability

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Web Site Corporate Video
– This is type of video that once consumers get to your web site can understand your business, products or services offered in a short period of time, and whether you fit their consumer choice. Usually corporate videos are 2-3 minutes in length depending on content, products or business services. A web site corporate video will leave a lasting visual impression with its viewer, especially if the viewer is researching many businesses online. example video

Image Commercial Spot 30 /60 Second
– This form a video production is a tease or explains a brief summary about business services or one product offered. The spot is usually 30 seconds in duration but 60 seconds is necessary for more detailed services. (Festival or Event, Car Dealership, Retail shop, Travel attraction) example video

Concept Commercial Spot 30 /60 Second – The difference between a concept spot and an image spot is that a concept commercial involves actors, 2D-3D animation, provides more thought of themes, colors, slogans, and tag lines to bring the viewer to remember the commercial through emotion rather than just the facts. This commercial costs more because it takes more time to develop the concept and shoot specific shots to capture the emotion. This type of commercial spot is usually part of a lengthy marketing campaign. (Geico lizard, Coca-Cola, Budweiser Frogs) example video

Testimonial Video – This type of video is an interview style production which asks a consumer about a service or product. The testimonial video is used to relate to a new consumer evaluating and supporting a product or service. Testimonial videos can be found within corporate video productions, or on web site pages to support the product or service being sold. Testimonials can range from a couple of seconds to minutes in duration depending on how precise the persons’ answers are. example video

Documentary Style Video Segment – This video production is longer in duration and is used to present a mood or capture the essence of business through a common theme or slogan throughout. This type of video uses all the above styles combined into one segment such as interviews, testimonials, concepts, graphics, animation and more. In short it’s like creating a “mini-movie” about the subject of the business or what the business stands for.

Visit ADR Productions at www.adr-productions.com

“Codec” is a technical name for “compression/decompression”. It also stands for “compressor/decompressor” and “code/decode”. All of these variations mean the same thing: a codec is a computer program that both shrinks large movie files, and makes them playable on your computer. Codec programs are required for your media player to play your downloaded music and movies.

“Why do we need codecs?”

Because video and music files are large, they become difficult to transfer across the Internet quickly. To help speed up downloads, mathematical “codecs” were built to encode (“shrink”) a signal for transmission and then decode it for viewing or editing. Without codecs, downloads would take three to five times longer than they do now.

“Is there only one codec I need?”

Sadly, there are hundreds of codecs being used on the Internet, and you will need combinations that specifically play your files. There are codecs for audio and video compression, for streaming media over the Internet, videoconferencing, playing mp3’s, speech, or screen capture. To make matters more confusing, some people who share their files on the Net choose to use very obscure codecs to shrink their files. This makes it very frustrating for users who download these files, but do not know which codecs to get to play these files. If you are a regular downloader, you will probably need ten to twelve codecs to play your music and movies.

“What are the common codecs people use?”

Some codec examples are MP3, WMA, RealVideo, RealAudio, DivX and XviD. There are many other more obscure codecs.

“Isn’t ‘.AVI’ a codec already?”

AVI is not in itself a codec; it is a common “container format” that many different codecs can use. As there are hundreds of codecs out there are compatible with AVI content, it can get very confusing which codec(s) you will need to play your video files.

“How do I know which codec to download and install?”

Your Windows Media Player will often try to communicate to you the 4-character code of the specific codec it needs. Note this code, then visit this website http://www.fourcc.org/fcccodec.htm to obtain the missing codec. For a small FAQ section, follow the link on the left called “Sample Code”.

“What are the codecs I should download and install?”

There is no single best answer to this question. There are so many codec choices. The easiest option is to download “codec packs”. Codec packs are collections of codecs gathered in single large files. There is much debate over whether it is necessary to get a large group of codec files, but it certainly is the easiest and least-frustrating option for new downloaders. Here are the codec packs we recommend at About.com:

  1. CCCP Combined Community Codec Pack is one of the most comprehensive codec packages you can download. CCCP was put together by users who like to share and watch movies online, and the codecs they’ve chosen are designed for 99% of the video formats you will experience as a P2P downloader. It is still virus-free as of February, 2010, so definitely consider CCCP if you think your computer needs updated codecs.
  2. XP Codec Pack XP Codec Pack is a sleek, all-in-one, spyware / adware free codec collection that also offers a good, solid Media Player Classic. Currently just under 6MB in size, XP Codec Pack is truly one of the most complete assemblies of codecs needed to play all major audio and video formats.
  3. K-Lite Codec PackVery user-friendly and well tested, K-Lite Codec Pack is loaded with goodies. It will enable you to play all the popular movie formats. K-Lite comes in 4 flavors: Basic, Standard, Full and Mega. If all you need is to be able to play DivX and XviD formats, Basic will do just fine. Standard pack is probably the most popular – it has everything an average user needs to play the most common file formats. Full pack, designed for power users, has even more codecs plus encoding support.
  4. K-Lite Mega Codec Pack Mega is a very comprehensive bundle…it has everything but a kitchen sink. Mega even contains QuickTime Alternative and Real Alternative.

Reprinted from One Market Media (Jimm Fox).  Visit them at http://onemarketmedia.com/

Visit ADR Productions on the web at www.adr-productions.com

Some people come into video production thinking it won’t cost very much and think it takes just a few hours to do. Sometimes it can be that way but most of the time it isn’t. Some of the factors that can determine the cost for digital video productions are:

* Experience
* Equipment
* Time
* Production Value

EXPERIENCE
Experience counts for a lot when choosing a producer/videographer/editor. They understand how to spend the
time wisely and efficiently. The less experience someone has the more likely mistakes will show up when you
start a production. Is there good audio, was there enough light on the subject, how slick does the
production look? Most of the high quality work that is done in videography/editing is never noticed even though you do see it. It just looks good. Lower quality work is more noticeable as unattractive or lacking something.
If you look around you can find some individuals out there who have plenty of good experience and creativity and not charge an arm and a leg for it. Whoever you look at, watch their clip reels, observe their work history and talk with them to get an idea of what they have to offer.

EQUIPMENT
Equipment is the next consideration. The type used can add a lot of quality and/or cost to a production. Do
you want the video production done in HD or SD? HD is going to cost more but that is where all production is
going. Though SD is still very good for web videos or internal company use. There are many tiers of HD and
SD equipment and you should be aware that the more sophisticated the stuff is, the more it will cost to use. Most companies have invested $15,000 for a camera, lights, and audio gear. Other have invested $30,000 to $100,000 or more. Get the camera/crew that fits your needs.

And it’s not just the camera. There are lights, microphones, teleprompter and other accessories that help with the creation but add to the cost, especially if more people are involved. So, how many people will be on site? Each person adds a significant amount to that total. Is the crew just 1 person or is it 2 or more? Location is something else that will dictate what is needed. Is it indoors or outdoors? Way out of town or in the suburbs?

The other half to this production is the video editor. They too have a lot of equipment that needs to be updated on a constant basis. New and better techniques are evolving which requires upgrades and further investments, again in the $5,000 to $20,000+ range. Some monitors for color correcting cost around $10,000 each.

One of the major stumbling blocks to having a pleasant production experience is the type of video format you choose to use. Be especially aware of the formats and codecs. Talk with your video production team and choose a format/codec that is compatible to both the videographer and editor. It is real important to talk with both before starting a production. Not just the videographer. Not just the editor. Both! There are a lot of new and evolving developments within the industry which changes the playing field on a regular basis. If you have both of these folks on the same page you can save yourself some money and lots of headaches.

TIME
This is a very important point: make most of your decisions during pre-production, making changes mid-production can be very costly. The decision making process is the most expensive part of any video production and eats up most of the time. Which is why the more time you spend on pre-production the less time is spent making last minute decisions during the actual production, therefore saving you money. Some items to focus on are: a script, location, if and who will be the on-camera person and preparing them for their appearance, any props you need, make sure they are ready by the day of the shoot. The more of these projects you do the better you will get. Experience of the crew will also show in the time spent during production. These are some time saving features during a shoot but what about in post? Sometimes changing a font is easy and doesn’t cost much, other times it almost means a complete rework of a video edit. It really depends on where in the process the change is made and how many other steps are affected by that change. This is with all aspects of post. Find out how many other things get changed when you ask for “your” one change. Where it lands in the process makes a huge difference.

Expect it to take a minimum of at least a half day for a simple video production shoot. The time needed will depend on how long the total piece is that you are creating and how much production value you want to invest in the video. The crew will need to set up their equipment and make sure everything is ready for the on-camera
person. Lights, audio and anything else required for the video will be included at this time. This process
can take anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour (or more) to complete. Again, how complicated and involved is the shoot? The more involved the longer it takes to set up. Higher quality requires more time to set up. Be prepared for this necessary prep time. It makes a big difference in how the final product looks. Then there is the on-camera person. Are they comfortable in front of a camera, are they experienced or is this their first time? Even the best of talent will need more than a couple of takes to get the “good one”. A newbie will require more takes but isn’t it better to spend an additional 15 minutes to get a good take then to try and edit around the mistake in post and still not be happy with it? Once the shoot is finished, all of the equipment needs to be packed up and removed. This tends to be faster than the set-up time. Keep in mind every time you need to change locations the whole tear-down/set-up process has to be done all over again.

Editing generally takes longer to complete than the actual shoot. First the video needs to be brought into
the computer which can take time. Is it tape based or file based video captured in the field? If an hour of video is shot on tape, it will take one hour of time to get it into the computer before editing can even begin. If it is file based it will take a shorter amount of time. Deciding which “takes” are the good ones requires listening to all of them. This in and of itself takes time. Most of the time a producer is responsible for this step. In other productions another person like a writer is the responsible person. It all depends on what type of production and where the duties lie for each individual. Do graphics need to be created? This takes time. Is everything all gathered together and ready to go? If not, this can cause delays in the middle of an edit. Once an edit is finished it still may need more work. Like audio sweetening, color correcting, etc. Then it will need to be rendered, exported and turned into whatever format is needed as a deliverable. This takes time. Sometimes hours. Also, how many proofs are needed before a final is agreed upon by the “decider”. Each redo takes time. Not all corrections take only a minute or two, some take an hours.

One time saver is to have all of these elements ready to go at the beginning of the edit. A script will really
help speed up the editing process. It makes it easier for the editor to follow along with the different takes and ensures that all elements are included in the edit. Having the script on hand will also help determine what graphics are needed. What music if any is wanted? Is there any animation? What are the names and titles of people shown in this video? Do you need them identified?

Other items to consider are; what final format is the product supposed to be? This can be a different format from the one used on the video shoot. What dimension size is needed? How will it be delivered? These bits of information are important to know from the beginning of the production to help save time in the long haul. Each process requires a certain amount of time. Be aware of how long it takes to do what you want in “production” and smart decisions will follow.

PRODUCTION VALUE
This is an intangible type of thing. This is the creativity of the people involved and how they go about
incorporating it into the video. Sometimes these are very well thought out methods and procedures, sometimes
quirky, on-the-spot changes and sometimes it’s trying to get things perfect and paying attention to detail.
There are many little things added together and they all add time to the production. Changing the audio level,
getting rid of a hiss, doing a take one more time to get the shot just right, changing the light just a
little, adding a filter, re-working the script, adding more graphic elements, adding music, adding animation, editing out something someone said because it is too late to have it re-shot, experimenting with several methods to reach a “best” solution, correcting color; all of this takes time. But this kind of time is well spent. This is your look and feel – your image.

COST
You can take all of the above mentioned factors into consideration to help you determine how much time it would take to create your video. The more involved it is the more time it will take. The more simple it is the less time it will take. One is not necessarily better than the other. However, how that time is spent is important.

If you think a completed video, shot and edited for you, can be done for $100 think again. Add another zero
to it and it will be closer to what needs to be spent to get a very basic video done. Different types of production will cost different amounts. If it is a simple talking head, either with a green screen are office background, then that doesn’t take too much time to shoot or edit. It still may take two to three hours of shoot time and depending on how many takes were done, it could take another 2, 3 or 4 hours to edit. You are still looking at a starting price of around $200 for a very simple one camera, no lights, mike on a camera shoot with not much editing done other than getting it ready for the web. A more realistic approach is to figure that a finished video will cost anywhere from $200 to $2000 for every finished minute. (That $200 is rock bottom by the way and is rarely met.) Given that range, a 3 minute video could cost anywhere from $600 to $6000. Some folks would even say that $6000 is too cheap for making a good production. To give you a different perspective; the average cost to produce a 30-second national television ad in 2001 was $358,000. You obviously don’t need to spend that much unless you are wanting to advertise nationally.

These sums probably don’t help much because it is such a wide range but that is part of the business. There is such an extensive variety of production styles and such a wildly different set of expectations that sometimes it’s just a simple jump into hard reality that will give you a number that works for you. If you are interested in creating a video for the web, launching a company product or making a training video then having a better idea on what is involved in making a video can help lead you into making a better budget for a video production. This in turn should give you a better product in the end and will make you much more pleased with the whole experience.

visit us on the web at:  www.adr-productions.com

Shooting and editing video is easy, right? After all, everyone is doing it, plans on doing it, or wants to do it. So what’s the problem? Why are there so many poor videos out there? YouTube, GoogleVideo, Liveleak, and other websites have loads of them. You’ll find them on DVDs, and even on some television broadcasts. Why is this happening?

Because basic rules of editing are often violated or ignored altogether. True, art has no “rules” yet there are some basic practices to which viewers have become accustomed and even expect.

Following these small tips will help you to make better DVD’s and web video. You’ll note that the first few tips are related to camera work and not the computer/editing aspect of the project.  Great video begins before you get it into your computer.  Great editing is much easier with good camera work.

Shoot for the edit
When you’re shooting your video, be peripherally aware of how you’ll be editing the story. This can be difficult with family/vacation videos etc, but shooting with some idea of how you want to tell the story will help. For example, you might consider starting each shot by tilting down from the sky, and finishing each shot tilting up towards the sky. Perhaps there is an element in the shot to the left or right that could be panned to/from at the beginning of each shot, or perhaps even the panning itself can be incorporated as part of a transitional element.

This technique like any other, may be over used if there are several scenes to be cut, so think about how many scenes you may be shooting. If it’s a lengthy vacation video, you won’t want to be panning to the sky every couple of minutes for half an hour. Also for family/vacation type footage, be aware of changing the camera position or angle.  Move yourself around every minute or two. Go from a wide angle to a tighter shot. This will provide more flexibility when editing.

Give Yourself Some TIME
One error many shooters make improperly is to begin shooting when they press the “Record” button. Do your best to get at least five seconds of pre-roll and five seconds of post roll. Not only will this provide some “head/tails” for the editing process, but it also might mean you catch some blooper or other fun content. Also, it gives your tape time to wind around the head so you’re not clipping off part of the action. If you’re in one of those “WHERE IS MY PICTURE/CAMERA???” (WIMP) situations, start the camera rolling before you remove the lens cap or start pointing the camera. Just get it rolling and worry about everything else later.

Get Stable
Nothing is more difficult to watch or edit as jerky, zoomy footage. Nothing screams “AMATEUR” more loudly than jerky or zoomy footage. Use the zoom quickly or not at all when the camera is recording. Try to avoid holding the camera at eye level; this is where the small LCD monitor panels are very useful, but be aware that using the LCD monitor also means faster battery drainage. Try to hold the camera steady at chest level, digging elbows into your sides, forming a crude tripod with hands on camera and elbows against the body. Monopods or tripods make shooting with stability easier, but also makes for a less portable shooting solution when shooting those quick moments.

When you do pan or zoom, be sure to hold on the subject for at least a few seconds. For example, if you are zooming in or panning on a tree to show a bird’s nest in the tree, make sure you hold on the nest before panning/zooming away.

Now Hear This
Audio is usually forgotten in the heat of the moment, and in those “WIMP?!” moments, that’s OK. But in situations where you’re calling the shot, audio is much more important than the picture. Viewers can forgive and even not notice poor framing, exposure, or even focus if the audio is good. Audiences “see” differently when good audio is present, and by the same rule, see differently when audio is poor. If it’s a challenge to hear what’s taking place, the senses attempt to process the audio as best as possible. We’re predominantly aural animals, so do what you can to have great audio. That might mean a better microphone on your camera or subject, or even going as far as acquiring an inexpensive wireless to allow for roving camera while keeping audio sources in one location.

If you’re doing an interview, prior to hitting the Record button you might want to ask your subject to speak up, particularly if you’re using an on-camera mic. If your voice will be heard on the recording too, consider speaking less loudly than you might normally speak, because you’re closer to the camera than your subject is. Use good judgment when choosing music. Your favorite Nickelback tune probably won’t work well with that cut of your son or daughter hitting a home run.

Take Two
When possible, shoot the same scene twice from two different angles or focal lengths. Shoot wide and then get in close, taking one high shot and then one low shot, or whatever other creative angles you might find. Get some “B-roll,” shots you can cut away to/from. For instance, you might shoot the winning field goal at the end of the game with a wide angle, but don’t be afraid of asking someone to kick the ball into the net again after the game, or better yet, shoot medium or close shots from time to time during the game. These can be used to prolong the moment, or provide more information.

Name That Tape
Label tapes. Label them by date, order, or Ovaltine Secret Code, but label those tapes. And when you capture those tapes, use the name of the tape as part of the capture folder. If you’re not using tape, such as with the newer AVCHD camcorders, then label a file folder with a unique name prior to transfer. You might even consider putting a text file in the folder describing the contents, as this will help you in the sorting of tapes. Some NLE’s such as Sony Vegas (professional version) offer searchable media managers that will help locate a specific file when you need to find it quickly. At the end of the day, if the file isn’t labeled, it doesn’t exist in the digital sense. Computers are for making life easier; help the computer do its job by labeling that information.

Picture This
Use graphics, title cards, or still photos to illustrate a shot or to cover a difficult edit point. Title cards or graphics can also be used to stretch a scene where the camera might not have been pointed at the subject just yet, or was turned away too quickly. They also come in handy during a focus or exposure shift due to auto settings on the camera. Cutting to a graphic or title card also provides a way to literally tell the audience what they’re going to see, are seeing, or have just seen if the video wasn’t completely compelling. “Will Johnny make the goal?” or “What Happens Next?” are two examples of title cards. These worked for years in the era of silent film, and can still be used to good advantage.

Edit for the Story
If you’re telling a story, cut out everything that isn’t related to the story. I recommend considering the audio first, so that the audio has a good rhythm and flow, and the picture will generally follow as a result. If the picture doesn’t follow, then B-roll, graphics, or title cards can be used to help carry the story along as long as the audio is in good rhythm. B-roll and graphics are good for transitional elements as well.

Speaking of Transitions
Every video editing package comes with at least a hundred transitions. That doesn’t mean each one needs to be used. In fact, 95% of them shouldn’t be used. Fly-away cubes, bouncing balls, shatters, etc should all be relegated to the deep dark corners where only the dust kitties play. There are instances where they may be considered tasteful, however rare they may be. Wipes and dissolves are very common for a reason; they’re not incredibly noticeable, and more importantly, they’re expected. Long dissolves are great for showing passage of time, flash transitions can be used to grab attention or create a transition to a flashback, wipes are great for going from location to location or from one distinct scene to another.

Hustle n’ Flow
Just like great music has a rhythm you can dance to, good video editing has a rhythm that can be sensed by the audience. Learning to edit to a rhythm isn’t hard to learn, but it can be difficult to learn to do it well. Cutting to musical beats is a good way to get started. Tools like Ultimate S or StillMotion for Sony Vegas can also help in this learning curve.

At the end of the day, editing is a series of cuts that remove parts of the story that don’t pertain to the clean, clear presentation of the story. Editing involves creating elements that help move the story along, whether they’re transitional, informational, directional, or clarifiers. Audio elements are cut so the story moves along and is clear and comprehensible.  Just as you would cut out “uh, um, oh by the way. . . ” from your audio, think of the video cuts as being the removal of the video equivalent of “uh, um, oh by the way. . . ” Cut  shaky footage, focus changes, just plain boring bit and any other shots that take away from your film.

Finally, practice. Like anything else worth doing, it takes practice to be a good editor, learning the rhythm and flow of a good video production that compels the audience to watch through to the end.  With this in mind, go shoot AND edit some great video!

As always, ADR Productions will work with you on any project you feel is beyond your production skills.

 

Visit our website at:  www.adr-productions.com

Professionals will often prefer to purchase a 3 CCD video camera, as these offer many benefits over other models. Consumer video cameras are perfect for documenting family memories. However, they are not suited for professional productions. There are many reasons why professionals will prefer 3 CCD cameras over consumer level camcorders.

What Is a CCD?

Almost all digital cameras on the market use CCDs. These are special electronic chips that convert the light entering the lens into electrical signals, which can then be stored. These chips are essential for all digital cameras to function correctly. A 3CCD video camera has three separate CCD sensors. Each of these collects Red, Blue and Green light separately.

Superior Quality

The quality of videos made with 3 CCD video cameras is superior to videos made with consumer level camcorders. Because different colors are collected on separate sensors, they can then be recombined to produce a very high quality and high resolution photograph.

Even camcorders with a higher resolution will normally produce poorer quality images than a 3CCD camera. This is because they need to use interpolation algorithms which reduce the actual resolution of the image.

More Advanced

A normal consumer level camcorder will feature a single CCD. This CCD will capture all of the colors of light entering the lens. By using a 3CCD model, it’s possible to take a step into the world of professional film making. There have been quite a few professional films which have been captured on these professional 3CCD camcorders.

Many of these video cameras have interchangeable lenses. This is very different to a consumer level camcorder which has a single fixed lens that cannot be removed. The ability to change lenses makes it much easier to shoot in a variety of different conditions.

Reliability

While these cameras are more complicated, they are much more reliable. Professionals will be aware that these are built to high specifications, which will ensure that they won’t let you down. These camcorders can cope with being used every day without any trouble. These are also much more rugged than a typical consumer camcorder, and this means that they do not need to be handled with kid gloves.

Flexibility

A consumer level video camera will shoot high quality video in most, but not all, situations. A 3CCD sensor is much more flexible as it allows you to shoot in a wide range of different lighting conditions. The three separate CCDs in the camera will ensure that the images are clearer and sharper, even when shooting in poor light conditions.

Choosing a 3CCD Video Camera

When looking for 3CCD video cameras, you will need to look at a few different names. These cameras are also sold as 3MOS and 3 chip cameras. It’s a good idea to stick to a well known brand name for these cameras, as this will ensure that you choose a high quality and high resolution camcorder.

Not all 3CCD video cameras are created equal. It’s a good idea to test the camera out before buying it as this will give you the chance to check how everything works.

Visit our website at www.adr-productions.com

At ADR Productions, we want to wish everyone a joyful and safe New Year 2011!

2011 marks another year where we hope to make new friends and visit with old friends.  We have some new and exciting ideas to bring you throughout 2011 which we hope you will enjoy.

As always, your suggestions and referrals are always appreciated!

We See Us in Our Customers!™

Sincerely,
Scott Shirley – Owner

Visit us on the web at www.adrproductions.com

It’s a good feeling when you can look back on a year and have it bring a smile to your face.  2010 was one of those years!

In 2010 we had the return of some old friends and the addition of some new friends.

We started the year off with the conclusion of the Stixrud project which started in September 2009.  Dr. Stixrud is a professor of neuropsychology who who specializes in the evaluation of children, adolescents, and adults with learning, attention, and/or social/emotional difficulties.  He partnered with us to film a twelve session training course  with the goal of creating an online course for his customers.  I found myself absolutely amazed at the information I gathered about the effects of TV on young children during the filming of this project.

Spring of 2010 saw the return of Elan DanceSport Center and their ProAm showcase.  We also welcomed a new customer to ADR Productions in the ballroom dance genre, Dance Factory!  The Dance Factory gave us a trial run on their Spring ProAm dance showcase and expressed the complete satisfaction with the finished product.

Summer of 2010 brought the addition of the semi-pro football team, Virginia Lions, to the ADR Productions family.  The Lions are part of the AFL and have committed to making ADR Productions their official video production company in 2011.

Fall of 2010 again saw the return of Elan DanceSport Center and The Dance Factory for their Fall ProAm showcase performances.  These really are must see events if you get a chance when they return in the Spring of 2011.

2010 also saw several other new clients such as ARMI Live and Urban Fat Chords, The Producers Choice music software.

We continue to run into old friends in the industry and make new ones.  I would like to welcome TimeLine Media to our circle of friends in the production arena.  We have had the great pleasure of working beside Rassi Borneo and his wife Bryony.  If you are looking for a professional photography company, Timeline Media should be your first choice.

At ADR Productions, we just want to say thanks to all of our new and old friends who have helped to make 2010 a very special year. We will see you in 2011!

Join us on Facebook at ADR Productions’ Facebook page!

Thanks,

Scott Shirley

ADR Productions

Visit us at:  www.adr-productions.com

ADR Productions is one of the premier production companies in the Washington, DC area.

They are located in Rockville, Maryland and operated by Scott Shirley.   They are most recognized for their work on the “Behind the Scenes of Extreme Makeover Home Edition” documentary featuring the build for a family of fifteen people in the Poolesville, MD area.

In 2004, ADR Productions produced a concert video for the popular rock band “Live”.

In 2009, ADR Productions teamed up with RaySat Broadcasting to produce several training videos featuring their T7 Mobile Satellite System with the AT&T CruiseCast Service.

Fall 2009 brings more exciting projects to ADR Productions with the return of Elan DanceSport Center’s “Dance Showcase” production featuring professional and armature dancers from around the Washington Metropolitan area. They have also contracted this fall with William Stixrud, PH.D., & Associates to produce and online course study video in neuropsychological education.

ADR Productions has been donating services every fall since 2004 to one Maryland high school to produce their football season highlights. This year they will be filming for the mighty Northwest Jaguars in Germantown, MD.

In 2009, ADR Productions added photography services with the addition of Giovanni Pizzino who is one of the area’s top photographers.

ADR Productions works in all areas from business video production to family video production. They have three departments of practice:

  1. Video Production
  2. Independent Media Production
  3. Entertainment Production